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Is Erdogan’s survival detrimental to Turkish democracy?

The Turkish prime minister is using his executive powers in what seems a desperate effort to alter the legal system to protect himself and his government against further corruption allegations.
Demonstrators protest against Turkey's ruling AK Party (AKP), demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan, in Istanbul December 30, 2013. Erdogan swore on Sunday he would survive a corruption crisis circling his cabinet, saying those seeking his overthrow would fail just like mass anti-government protests last summer.    REUTERS/Osman Orsal (TURKEY - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST) - RTX16XIC

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan is fighting hard to dispel the black clouds that have gathered over his government after a prosecutor initiated a massive corruption probe on Dec. 17, which also implicated members of his government.

Erdogan, who claims he is faced with an international conspiracy aimed at toppling his government, is using his executive powers now in what seems a desperate effort to alter the legal system as well as regulations governing policing practices, to protect himself and his government against further corruption allegations.

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